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Editor’s note: This account is reprinted with permission from the October newsletter of the Shippensburg Historical Society. Jake Crider and his family lived at Maclay’s Mill along the Conodoguinet Creek, and he attended The Pine Grove School in the village of Mowersville. Crider attended sc…

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Editor’s note: This account is reprinted with permission from the September newsletter of the Shippensburg Historical Society. Jake Crider and his family lived at Maclay’s Mill along the Conodoguinet Creek, and he attended The Pine Grove School in the village of Mowersville. Crider attended …

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Editor's Note: Dr. John Fague is a World War II veteran from Shippensburg who submits his letters and columns from the war to The News-Chronicle periodically. We hope you enjoy his pieces on the war and his time in Germany.

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Well, that time of year is here again; time to roll out the red carpet for the town’s Memorial Day commemoration. This is a tradition that dates back more than 100 years, believe it or not! You might wonder how I know that since I myself haven’t reached that 100-year milestone; well let’s ju…

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Editor's note: This is the fifth and final of several features of Dr. McCall's piece on Frank Toth, the late tailor who hailed from Hungary and had his shop at 1 E. Burd St. in Shippensburg. The features were published on Page 3 in the Weekend Edition over the last several weeks. The first f…

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Editor's note: This is the fourth of several features of Dr. McCall's piece on Frank Toth, the late tailor who hailed from Hungary and had his shop at 1 E. Burd St. in Shippensburg. The features will run in the Weekend Edition over the next several weeks as space allows. The first feature wa…

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Editor's note: This is the third of several features of Dr. McCall's piece on Frank Toth, the late tailor who hailed from Hungary and had his shop at 1 E. Burd St. in Shippensburg. The features will run in the Weekend Edition over the next several weeks as space allows. The first feature was…

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Editor's note: This is the second of several features of Dr. McCall's piece on Frank Toth, the late tailor who hailed from Hungary and had his shop at 1 E. Burd St. in Shippensburg. The features will run in the Weekend Edition over the next several weeks as space allows. The first feature wa…

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Editor's note: This is the first of two or three features of Dr. McCall's piece on Frank Toth, the late tailor who hailed from Hungary and had his shop at 1 E. Burd St. in Shippensburg. The features will run in the Weekend Edition over the next few weeks as space allows.

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The Black Horse Tavern along King Street in Shippensburg was formerly known as Rippey's Tavern, built in the 1700s by Samuel Rippey, who operated the tavern until after 1750. His son, Capt. Rippey operated the tavern before 1771 until 1819. The tavern was made famous on Oct. 12, 1794, when G…

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When I was a young lad growing up in Ross Township, west of Pittsburgh, in the early 1940s, I wanted a bicycle. I knew my parents could not afford to buy me one because this country was growing out of the Great Depression, and money was scarce. My parents needed all of the money they had to …

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The last quarter of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century were the heydays of the streetcar or trolley cars. All the big cities and towns had this modern means of transportation. It was natural that such good things would spread to the villages and hamlets of the Cumberl…

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I admire the mailmen and ladies who deliver my mail six days a week. I will be lying on my reclining chair on my sun porch and the glass storm door to my sun porch opens. In comes my mailman with letters for me, plus a newspaper and maybe a magazine.

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Leslie Branham of Chambersburg purchased these vintage photos of Beistle Co. employees from the Fayetteville Flea Market, and shared them recently with The News-Chronicle. Pictured are groups of employees from the long-time Shippensburg business from 1950 and 1953. The Beistle Co. is the old…

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In my 50 years in the veterinary profession, I have declawed many cats. I would not think of declawing a cat without first giving it anesthesia. I couldn't believe when I read the state of New Jersey is thinking of banning declawing cats. The bill has passed in the House, but is still waitin…

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John Singleton Mosby was a small wisp of a man, always restless and absolutely fearless. Raised on a farm near Charlottesville, Virginia, he entered Confederate service in 1861 as a private in Col. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry regiment. Mosby proved such a daring horseman that in January 1863, St…

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The Peerless Furniture Co. was incorporated in February 1910, and the pictured factory erected in the months that followed. Operation started May 1, 1910, with A.C. Book as the first manager, the product being house furniture. But the plant did not produce overstuffed or upholstered furnitur…

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John Buford was a highly promising but little publicized officer who died before his full potential was realized. He would be remembered for one heroic action as the Battle of Gettysburg unfolded. Like Abraham Lincoln, Buford was born in Kentucky and came of age in Illinois. An 1848 graduate…

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The Confederates had a real “miracle worker.” It was Gen. Josiah Gorgas. What he accomplished for the always hard-pressed South during the war almost defies belief.

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One of the most lasting contributions of the Civil War to American life is the simple melody that remains our most famous bugle call.

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One of the most quoted untruths is Thomas Carlyle’s assertion that “the history of the world is but the biography of great men.” The Civil War encompassed far more than the political or military feats of a few celebrated figures. It was history made by the American people as a whole.

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The land was once a beautiful estate. It ended as a burial ground. What was intended to be a gracious home for the living became a somber haven for the dead. Few historic places in America underwent a more drastic conversion than Arlington National Cemetery.

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He was the pioneer of American political cartooning as well as its greatest practitioner. For 30 years, his drawings reduced infamous politicians to clownish characters. His work, one journalist wrote, was “savage and bitter,” and stung like a whip. “He tells in 10 strokes of his pencil what…

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Today our nation recognizes the gallantry of those in the armed services with a variety of awards such as the Distinguished Service Medal and the Navy Cross. No such honors existed at the time of the Civil War. The Purple Heart, or Badge of Military Merit, had been instituted by George Washi…

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The year was 1938, and I delivered the Pittsburgh Press and Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. I had to make sure which house got which paper, or I would be in trouble.

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The idea of chemical warfare did not originate in World War I. Killing troops with poison gas was proposed 50 years earlier during the American Civil War. Another fearsome weapon that would slaughter men in droves in the 20th Century – the machine gun – was conceived and designed during the …

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A number of local ladies' aid societies came into being in the North soon after the war began. The mission of these groups was to improve the health and living conditions of Federal soldiers, whose camps were notoriously unsanitary.

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Sally Louise Tompkins has been called “the Florence Nightingale of the South,” and for good reason.

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Phoebe Pember was one of the South's unsung heroes. Her wartime services might have gone unnoticed had she not later composed a memorable account, “A Southern Woman's Story,” relating her experiences as a matron at Chimborazo, the Confederacy's largest hospital. The task she assumed presente…

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She was born on Christmas Day, 1821, in Oxford, Massachusetts. Much younger than her four siblings, she was a shy, anxious child. She spent two years nursing an invalid brother back to health before going to work as a teacher at the age of 15. Teaching gave her confidence, but she left the c…

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Belle Boyd defied belief. Her astounding career as a Confederate spy, fugitive, Prisoner of War, actress and celebrity intertwined fact and fiction so tightly that historians have found it difficult to unravel the truth. One authority considered her among “the most active and reliable of the…

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The Civil War was the first great media event in American history, and the first war to be thoroughly documented using the emerging medium of photography. The daguerreotype – an image on silver-plated copper – had been introduced in 1839. That technique required a long exposure time and was …

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If Northerners had set out before the war to plant a spy in the heart of the Old South, they could not have come up with a better one than Elizabeth Van Lew.

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On Aug. 23, 1862, Allen Pinkerton and several of his agents went to a fashionable house on 16th Street in Washington and placed the owner under house arrest on charges of espionage. The news sent shock waves through the capital, for the suspect was one of the city's prominent hostesses, Rose…

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When I was a freshman at Penn State in 1942, all the male freshmen were expected to wear green caps. When we were walking on the sidewalk and met upperclassmen, we were expected to tip our cap to them. If we neglected this courtesy, they would shout, “Doff Frosh!”

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The long, slow journey of American women toward equal rights got an unprecedented boost during the Civil War. Women in that era were supposed to concern themselves with housekeeping and child rearing. Any woman who did more – especially in public – was viewed with distrust, if not, disgust. …

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Samuel Colt died in 1862 when the Civil War was less than a year old. Yet he had a powerful impact on this conflict, which was among the first waged with mass produced, rapid fire weapons, many of them of his making.

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Editor’s note: This account is reprinted with permission from the September newsletter of the Shippensburg Historical Society. Jake Crider and his family lived at Maclay’s Mill along the Conodoguinet Creek, and he attended The Pine Grove School in the village of Mowersville. Crider attended …

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In a country short on resources, isolated by the Union blockade and besieged by Federal armies, Samuel Preston Moore somehow managed to keep the Confederate States Medical Department alive and well, and affording legions of sick and wounded troops better treatment than many hospitals offered…

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When Richmond, Virginia, became the Confederate capital in May 1861, it was in many respects equal, if not superior, to Washington, D.C. Founded in the 1730s, when most of what is now the District of Columbia was an uninhabited swamp, Richmond was the third largest city in the South. Its pop…

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Surprise, surprise! Will wonders never cease? Sunday evening when I was eating my dinner at the Corner Restaurant/Select Diner at the corner of South Earl and East King streets, I was very surprised when I asked the nice waitress for my bill. She said, “Oh, it has already been taken care of!”